CHIKUPO FAMILY DESPERATE TO KEEP LEGACY

07 Jun, 2021 - 10:06 0 Views
CHIKUPO FAMILY DESPERATE TO KEEP LEGACY Clive Malunga (third from left)

H-Metro

Trust Khosa recently in Murewa

CLOSE relatives, children and friends to the late Tinei Chikupo reckon its challenging to keep the departed crooner’s musical legacy alive.

Family spokesperson and nephew to the Sirivhira Hande singer Fungai Chikupo conceded they had lost many relatives to show them the way.

Fungai Chikupo

“The main challenge we are facing right now is that we have lost so many relatives that we don’t have a father figure or mother to look up for advice.

 

“My uncle Tinei Chikupo was born in a family of seven and all the siblings comprising Paivha (male), Viress (female), Akurina (female), (Mhondiwa (male), Emery (female), Tendai (male) and himself (Tinei) all died and there is no one to guide us.

Elias Muchapondwa

“Our grandfather Nyahora Tafirenyika and grandmother Anna Katangure are both late which leaves us with a daunting task to praise our parents,” he said.

 

Fungai said while he could have filled Chikupo’s shoes as a singer since he plays mbira, work commitments were not permitting.

Workmen at Chikupo Mausoleum

“I’m employed as a civil servant and my job is demanding that I get posted and transferred from province to province.

 

“I can’t sit down and plan to sing because it’s really challenging and taxing. However, we have a daughter at C.U.T who is studying Accounting and we hope she can revive uncle Tenei’s legacy.

Brenda Chikupo

“She has been compiling her own songs and I can send you some to sample for yourself,” he said.

 

Asked what they have learnt from the gesture shown by Clive Malunga under Jenaguru Arts Centre, he said:

“To be honest I don’t have proper words to thank this man for what he has done for the family.

 

“It’s not easy that a stranger has remembered us almost 29 years after Tinei’s birth that he decided to construct his Mausoleum and the statue to be unveiled on August 1 here.”

 

He however took a swipe on people misrepresenting Tinei’s life when relatives to consult are still alive.

 

“While we are celebrating baba’s legacy, we are really concerned by some sections of the media peddling lies.

 

“There is one columnist who wrote that my father was buried at Churu farm and that he sold his house yet he did not provide evidence.

 

“Contrary to reports that he was buried at Churu Farm, baba is buried here in the Village where his mausoleum is being constructed.

 

“I wanted to take the issue further but ndakazongozvineterawo ndaona kuti hapana choziknwa nemunyori.

 

“All those who want information about our father are free to either come here or call any of his children,” he said.

 

On inheritance issues, Fungai added:

 

“Musically there is nothing we can say we benefited since we were young and unaware of the procedures to take.

 

“When he died, we could not establish the wealth he had acquired or the guitars that he used.

 

“failure to do so has also prompted some of the writers to peddle falsehoods but were are here to clarify some of the issues.”

 

Similar sentiments were echoed by Brenda Chikupo who said her father deserved to rest in peace.

 

“Surely our father deserves to rest in peace and these people writing falsehoods are misleading the nation.

 

“When baba died, I was still young but what I know is that he was a loving and caring daddy,” she said.

 

She hailed Malunga for the love he showed her dad.

 

“When Mr Malunga called us with the news that he wanted to set up something like this, we didn’t understand what he was up to.

 

“We are now happy because the project is now taking shape and on August 1 people will witness this thing being unveiled.

 

“We don’t know how to thank him as a family but only God knows the best way to honour his own.”

 

Brenda, who ekes out a living as a teacher in Chitungwiza, said she was proud of her dad who lived life to the fullest.

 

“I’m proud of my father because he did not only put Murewa on the map but he touched hearts of many Zimbabweans and that’s why he is still remembered in this way 29 years after his death.

 

“It’s not easy to be remembered in this way if you were a nobody,” she said.

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