Pakistan appoint Kirsten, Gillespie as head coaches

Pakistan have appointed former South Africa batsman Gary Kirsten as head coach of their men’s white-ball teams, while their test side will be guided by former Australia fast bowler Jason Gillespie, the country’s cricket board said yesterday.

Former Pakistan all-rounder Azhar Mahmood will assist both head coaches, the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) said, adding that all three had signed two-year deals.

“They’re both very famous coaches and their arrival gives you 100 percent confirmation of the trust that they have in our team’s potential,” PCB chairman Mohsin Naqvi told reporters.

Pakistan have been without a full-time head coach since Grant Bradburn left after their failure to make the knockout stage of the 50-overs World Cup in India last year.

Former captain Mohammad Hafeez served as team director and head coach during their tour of Australia.

In Kirsten, Pakistan have appointed an experienced coach who led India to the 50-over World Cup title in 2011, before the 56-year-old took over as South Africa coach.

He has also had stints in the Indian Premier League and is currently working as a mentor at Gujarat Titans. He will take up his new post with Pakistan after the tournament ends.

“My primary objective is to ensure the team operates at its optimal level. Success on the field is contingent upon the team performing at its best,” Kirsten said in a statement.

“Consistency and continuity are values I hold dear. While player form fluctuations are inevitable, maintaining a stable environment is crucial.”

He will join the team during their England tour featuring four Twenty20 internationals next month and his first major assignment will be the T20 World Cup in the United States and West Indies in June.

Gillespie, who has coached domestic teams in India, England and Australia, will take over before the two-test Bangladesh series in August.

“I love test cricket and being able to focus on that is something I like very much,” Gillespie said.

“I also love the fact that there’s so much talent in Pakistan. I like to think that I can help in some way to grow and develop the players.” — Reuters.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *