SAINTFLOEW FACES HIS DRUG DEMONS

Trust Khosa

MUSIC star Saintfloew has bravely agreed to confront his demons and deal with his drug and substance addiction.

He left Harare yesterday afternoon to check into a specialist facility in South Africa which deals with drug and substance addiction.

It’s a brave and welcome move for the musician and his handlers to confront and conquer a demon which has left considerable damage across the country and the world.

Saintfloew’s mother, Ebenezer Mambo (51), attributed her son’s drug problems to his difficult upbringing.

She said the rapper lost his father when he was just under two years, leaving no male figure to guide and discipline him.

Mambo, who had tried to discourage her son from pursuing music due to fears of drug abuse, praised the help offered by Nash Paints Group executive chairman, Tinashe Mutarisi.

She said Saintfloew was a brilliant student in school.

Speaking to H-Metro before Saintfloew’s departure for South Africa yesterday, Mambo said her son badly needed rehabilitation, which starts today.

“We lost his father when they were still very young and there was no man in the house to whip my son into line.

“I tried my best to give him a life, but there are some times where a father is needed in the upbringing of children.

“I have never doubted my son’s intelligence, but I was worried when he continued pursuing music. He ended up taking drugs and it pains me a lot,” she said.

Ebenezer Mambo

She said Mutarisi came into her 26-year-old son’s life at the right time.

“I am humbled that good people still exist as is the case with Mr Tinashe Mutarisi. I think he was sent by God to save my son from abusing drugs.

“Like the biblical Moses, Mutarisi has just done the best for my family and I hope my son will come back from South Africa a changed man.”

Mutarisi said it had not been easy to convince Saintfloew to undergo rehabilitation, but he hoped that he could inspire others on his return from South Africa.

“To be honest, I didn’t want to bring him closer due to stigma when I heard about his story. I then grew closer to him when he sang the song Cheka, which he dedicated to me.

“I realised that he was a nice young man who needed help and we had to offer him what he needed the most,” Mutarisi said.

“When I heard that his father died when he was just below two years and his admission that he needed rehabilitation, I had to assist him.

“He came one day and told me that he desperately needed rehabilitation. He said he was not into drugs, but one of his friends was into drugs.”

“He is a talented artist who has a lot of potential. He is also a role model, but he needs our help. We wish him the best in his fight against drug and substance abuse,” he said.

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